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Making a difference

On your ICS placement, you'll be helping to make a difference in one of eight countries across Africa and Asia.

Unlike other providers out there, we're not into 'voluntourism'. On ICS, you'll be contributing directly towards ending poverty. It's not a holiday, it's going to be hard work, but it'll teach you things you didn't know you could do.

You might be working on an education project in Kenyan secondary schools, explaining to young girls the process of menstruation for the first time.

Maybe you'll help a local fruit seller in a rural community in Uganda look at how he can make more profits so he can afford to put his son through education.

Or in Nicaragua, you could be learning how to pass on beekeeping training to local people so they can take on more environmentally-friendly work.

There are so many possibilities. But one thing we can guarantee is that you'll be using your skills and experience to make a change. What are you waiting for?

Start making a difference today

Three volunteer stories

Naseem delivered sex education classes in Loitokitok, Kenya
© ICS / VSO / Jack Howson
Naseem delivered sex education classes in Loitokitok, Kenya

Naseem's sex ed classes were a hit

Before ICS, Naseem Haque, 18, from Newcastle, had never taught a single lesson in his life.

But his placement with ICS landed him in the deep end. Within weeks, he was out in secondary schools in Kenya, working with a local counterpart to teach sex education classes to boys in rural villages.

Now back in the UK, thanks to his new-found confidence, he's off to uni in September. Go Naseem!

Raleigh Team Leader Bryony was based in northern Nicaragua
© ICS / Raleigh / Inga Pracute
Raleigh Team Leader Bryony was based in northern Nicaragua

Bryony got down to business

Bristol-based Bryony Sims, 26, was stuck in a dull corporate job before signing up as a Team Leader.

Her team of volunteers from the UK and Nicaragua were busy training local entrepreneurs.

“People in the community are snapping up the second-hand clothes sold by three sisters who, five months ago, were going to work on a pig farm. It's been really amazing to play a part in these stories."

Volunteer Asma went on to overturn a ban on hijabs in basketball
© ICS / VSO / Andrew Aitchison
Volunteer Asma went on to overturn a ban on hijabs in basketball

Asma reached high with her coaching

Asma Elbadawi, 25, from Bradford was always into basketball. So when she found herself on a project in Lindi, Tanzania, she used her skills for good.

While teaching a group of boys how to play, she discovered that sport promotes some serious messages about equality for girls - the theme of her ICS project and one of her biggest passions.

Find out what she achieved when she got back.

Find out more and apply